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Turn 3 (Double) Solitaire

A Quick Guide

  • Playing Turn-Three (Double) Solitaire requires two decks of cards, which means a total of 104 cards.

    Playing Turn-Three (Double) Solitaire requires two decks of cards, which means a total of 104 cards.

  • The 9 Tableau columns need organizing in a descending sequence from Kings down to Aces.

    The 9 Tableau columns need organizing in a descending sequence from Kings down to Aces.

  • The Stockpile has 59 cards where you draw three cards at a time. However, you can access only the top card of the three at a time.

    The Stockpile has 59 cards where you draw three cards at a time. However, you can access only the top card of the three at a time.

  • To win, you must stack the 8 Foundation piles in ascending order.

    To win, you must stack the 8 Foundation piles in ascending order.

Two Decks of Pure Challenges with Turn-Three (Double) Solitaire

If you feel like you’re a grandmaster at one-deck Solitaire, it’s time to try your hand at Turn-Three (Double) Solitaire! This game is a fantastic upgrade to the familiar game of Solitaire that you likely already know and love. Playing with two decks of cards doesn't necessarily mean two times the challenge — sometimes building up the suits comes even easier with more cards!

If you love building more suits in Solitaire, then Turn-Three (Double) Solitaire is your kind of game. You also get more value out of this version because of its slightly longer playtime. Build all eight suits in the time it takes to build four and you will have truly conquered this game!

If you’re a novice and stumbled on this Solitaire version by accident, don’t turn away. Master this game and you’ll be able to handle the single-deck version easily.

Juggle through 104 cards and master this exciting Turn-Three Double Solitaire challenge!

Playing Turn-Three (Double) Solitaire — The Layout

Understanding the layout of Turn-Three (Double) Solitaire is a necessary part of developing a winning strategy. Without completely grasping the setup, you’re at a disadvantage before you even begin. Let’s take a look at the layout so you can maximize your chances of winning. Remember, the distinguishing feature of Double Solitaire is that there are two decks of cards used in the game.

  • 1.The Tableau

    The Tableau has 9 columns that contain 45 cards. The first column has one card, the second has two, and so on until the ninth column, which has 9. All cards in the Tableau are face-down, so you don't know what you’ll find behind them. Only the top card in each column faces up.

    The Tableau
  • 2.The Stockpile

    The Stockpile holds the 59 remaining cards after dealing out the Tableau. The Stockpile is your source of reprieve when you don't have any moves left on the Tableau. A draw from the Stockpile releases 3 face-up cards at a time. However, there's a catch — only the top card of the three is usable in the game. Drawing again from the Stockpile will push the unused cards to the back. Therefore, be wise with how you use the Stockpile.

    The Stockpile
  • 3.The Waste Pile

    The Wastepile is the holding cell for the revealed cards from the Stockpile. Essentially, you draw from the Stockpile but use it from the wastepile. Unused Wastepile cards accumulate and then eventually return to the Stockpile for you to use again.

    The Waste Pile
  • 4.The Foundation

    You need to fill the 8 Foundation piles to win. Moving cards to the Foundation is as easy as clicking on the card or dragging and dropping it into its appropriate cell. Organize the cards in the Foundation in suits. Every suit has to be in an ascending order, from Ace to King. At the end of the game, if you organize all 104 cards in the Tableau, they will automatically move to the Foundation with a satisfying swirl of the cards.

    The Foundation

Explore the Extent of Your Skills with Two Decks

Turn-Three (Double) Solitaire is the perfect place to apply your advanced traditional Solitaire skills. And the two decks in the game promise to challenge your Solitaire skills even further.

King of the Solitaire

A Light and Easy Upgrade to the Original Game

  • 1.First, take stock of your layout and click once on the Stockpile to open it. This action will give you a full preview of what you have in hand. Move cards across the Tableau in a descending order, alternating colors. For example, you can only move a 5 of Hearts (a red card) under a 6 of Clubs or Spades (black cards). Focus on emptying columns and revealing all the cards it contains.

    First, take stock of your layout and click once on the Stockpile to open it. This action will give you a full preview of what you have in hand. Move cards across the Tableau in a descending order, alternating colors. For example, you can only move a 5 of Hearts (a red card) under a 6 of Clubs or Spades (black cards). Focus on emptying columns and revealing all the cards it contains.
  • 2.Move your Aces to the Foundation as soon as they become available. This action will not disrupt your game. The Foundation cells start building from Aces and go up to the King of each suit. Once you move a card to the Foundation, you can take it back as long as it’s the top card in that pile. However, you must have a spot in the Tableau to put the cards that you remove from the Foundation.

    Move your Aces to the Foundation as soon as they become available. This action will not disrupt your game. The Foundation cells start building from Aces and go up to the King of each suit. Once you move a card to the Foundation, you can take it back as long as it’s the top card in that pile. However, you must have a spot in the Tableau to put the cards that you remove from the Foundation.
  • 3.Drawing from the Stockpile gives you three cards at a time. However, only the topmost card can be used. While this rule may seem like a hindrance, you can sharpen your memory skills as you try to remember the other cards and consider where you can place them. Cards from the Stockpile move with the drag-and-drop feature or with a simple click.

    Drawing from the Stockpile gives you three cards at a time. However, only the topmost card can be used. While this rule may seem like a hindrance, you can sharpen your memory skills as you try to remember the other cards and consider where you can place them. Cards from the Stockpile move with the drag-and-drop feature or with a simple click.
  • 4.The Wastepile will hold the cards from the Stockpile for you to use. It functions as a holding cell for Stockpile cards. If you make a mistake by drawing from the Wastepile, retract your move by using our nifty UNDO button at the top of the screen. The HINT button is just as handy and will help you with suggestions to win.

    The Wastepile will hold the cards from the Stockpile for you to use. It functions as a holding cell for Stockpile cards. If you make a mistake by drawing from the Wastepile, retract your move by using our nifty UNDO button at the top of the screen. The HINT button is just as handy and will help you with suggestions to win.

The Challenge

Organize 104 cards on the Tableau in alternating colors AND descending order.

King of the Solitaire

Light-Bulb Tip!

Sneaking in a Solitaire session at work? Turn off the in-game sounds for a peaceful or stealthy game session on our platform.

Keyboard Shortcuts for Your Computer

Do you enjoy using the arrow keys to move your cards when playing? Here are some simple keyboard shortcuts for Mac and Windows computers to extend your keyboard use!

Windows

  • Undo:
    Ctr
    +
    Z
    or
    Backspace
  • Hint:
    H
  • Navigate:
  • Select:
    Space
    (once)
  • Move:
    Space
    in the new spot

Mac

  • Undo:
    delete
    or
  • Hint:
    H
  • Navigate:
  • Select:
    Space
    (once)
  • Move:
    Space
    in the new spot

Bask in the Glory of Your Next Solitaire Win

While winning at traditional Solitaire is quite the feat, completing a leveled-up game like Turn-Three (Double) Solitaire is a truly bragworthy accomplishment!

Winning Tips and Quirky Tricks

  • Click, Don’t Drag

    While dragging and dropping cards between columns is possible, the click action will automatically move cards, keeping your mind in the game without taking away your attention.

  • Turn Over All the Mystery Cards in the Tableau

    The Tableau’s face-down cards are your biggest obstacle in this game. Turn over these cards as soon as possible, and then you can work through the Stockpile and organize the cards over time.

  • Move Suits Equally to the Foundation

    Don’t focus on filling a single suit in the Foundation. Instead, give each suit in the Foundation some sort of equality so you can organize your Tableau piles more easily.

  • Have a Red and a Black Foundation Suit Ready

    As you play with two decks of cards, the tough part is making space for two cards of the same suit. Therefore, some cards serve a better purpose by moving them to the Foundation. If you keep a red suit and a black suit ready in the Foundation, you’ll have more options to move cards that are blocking your way.

  • Fun Fact!

    Solitaire gets its name from the Latin word Solitarius, meaning “alone.”

  • Fun Fact!

    Microsoft Windows introduced Solitaire on their computers in 1990.

  • Did you know?

    Our UNDO button will help you retrace your steps to make better choices!

  • Did you know?

    In Australia, Solitaire is known as “Australian Patience”!

More Power to You!

We understand that playing Solitaire is not just about the game — it’s about the experience. Our platform is built to bring players to the heart of Solitaire. Your triumphs, challenges, and overall play experience drive our purpose. Let’s win together!

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